Fang Talks

Now with even more obscure Homestuck references!

I don’t know, blogging is weird. Not that I’ve ever really explored it, as a space, but still I find it weird.

There’s a really wide and fairly evenly distributed range of points at which blogs get abandoned. We’ve all seen and smiled at the “hello, I’m gonna start a blog” post from ten years ago, with no other content to keep it company. Some realize it’s just not for them after a few posts, others bored after a couple months, and eventually the rest of them just burn out after some amount of years, either by loss of audience, motivation, confidence, or any sequence of those three.

Interestingly, most deaths I’ve witnessed had a fairly good community around them, or at least a bunch of regular readers who clumped together around that. Was their ongoing support not worth enough? The bonds not strong enough?

Of course the internet isn’t real life. Sometimes things just take priority.

Now, because the kind of people who write blogs are often the kind to read them, a decline in the one leads to a decline in the other. But we are clearly long past the glory days of Blogspot and the likes. What else could there be at play?

I don’t think it’s about attention span. Blogging is a way different medium in more than just average content length. Perhaps the seeming immediacy of social media is what draws people to it, not for desire of brevity, but that of contact. Typing something, sending it, and having it quickly consumed by your peers mimics much more closely how natural human interaction takes place. Face-to-face, friendly tit-for-tat, instant. That’s something blogging could never offer.

Not that it doesn’t have good qualities, of course! In fact, blogging is an overall great medium. Just trying to guess at how these things happen.

Comments

  • 25/09/2018 (3:40 PM)

    I don’t believe it’s attention span, either, even though that seems like the thing to say.

    Part of it is probably that people increasingly use their phones for internet use. Instagram and twitter are a lot easier to interact with on an iPhone than a blog is.

    Even facebook probably gets people a jolt of dopamine at the immediacy that most blogs can’t.

    • 25/09/2018 (7:04 PM)

      I had completely forgotten about phones. They are well-suited to short-form content.

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